Bismuth is a white, brittle metal with a slight pink color and is typically recovered as a by-product of lead and copper. It is commonly used as an alloying element for various low melting alloys where it is mixed with other metals such as Lead, Tin, or Cadmium. It is also used as well for a lead substitute in other materials. The Ingots are our largest size available and have a purity of 99.99% and often serve as grain refiner in the foundry industry as well. Our regular bars can be used in solder applications as a replacement for Lead since it is non-toxic. Our 1/8″ & down shot product allows you to make smaller additions during your casting process and has a purity of 99.9%.

 

Forms:
  • Slabs
  • #6 Small Shot Approx. 1/8" and Down
  • Regular Bar 1/2" X 7/8" X 13"
Belmont Product Code2001
Nominal Composition:
  • 99.99% Bi

Downloads:

Datasheet

Related products

  • Bismuth is a white, brittle metal with a slight pink color and is typically recovered as a by-product of lead and copper. It is commonly used as an alloying element for various low melting alloys where it is mixed with other metals such as Lead, Tin, or Cadmium. It is also used as well for a lead substitute in other materials. The Needles allow you to have more surface area and pack very tight when melting. They have a purity of 99.9%.

    Forms:
    • Needles
    Belmont Product Code2002
    Nominal Composition:
    • 99.9% Bi
  • Bismuth is a white, brittle metal with a slight pink color and is typically recovered as a by-product of lead and copper. It is commonly used as an alloying element for various low melting alloys where it is mixed with other metals such as Lead, Tin, or Cadmium. It is also used as well for a lead substitute in other materials. Our Powder is the finest form that we offer and has become increasingly popular as a substitute for Lead when producing Radiation Shielding Blankets. The powder has a purity of 99%.

    Forms:
    • 100 Mesh Powder
    Belmont Product Code2003
    Nominal Composition:
    • 99% Bi

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