Featuring: Body solders, Lead-base, Lead-free solders, Low melting solders, Miter-Al-braze (MAB), Tin-Antimony solders, Tin-base, Tin-Cadmium solders, Tin-Lead solders, Tin-Zinc solders

Soldering is a process in which two or more metal items are joined together by melting and flowing a filler metal (solder) into the joint, the filler metal having a lower melting point than the adjoining metal. Soldering differs from welding in that soldering does not involve melting the work pieces. In brazing, the filler melts at a higher temperature, but the work piece metal does not melt. In the past, nearly all solders contained lead, but environmental concerns have increasingly dictated use of lead-free alloys for electronics and plumbing purposes.

Belmont offers a range of high, medium, and low temperature soldering alloys to meet a variety of different needs.

Applications: Electronics, Plating, Plumbing, HVAC

Forms: Ingot, Regular Bar, Capping Bar, Nuggets, Shot, Special Forms

Showing all 11 results

Featured products

RELATED POSTS

Low-Melting Alloys Containing Indium: Characteristics and Applications

Often when thinking about metal alloys, we consider the strength and durability of the metal to withstand a range of loads, stresses and extreme temperatures. Yet there are a range of manufacturing applications where an alloy needs to have a low melting characteristic. A low-melting alloy, also called fusible alloy, can take a liquefied or…

Applications Using Low Melting Alloys

Low melting alloys are considered fusible alloys because they melt at temperatures below 300 degrees are often combined with other metals in order to increase certain properties. For example, Bismuth is often combined with tin and/or silver to create lead-free solders that are non-toxic. Low Melting Alloy Applications and Uses Low melting alloys can be…

Liquid metal’s low melting point

Fusible alloys’ low melting point makes them useful in a wide variety of applications The melting point of aluminum is 1,220 degrees Fahrenheit. Carbon steel melts somewhere between 2,600 and 2,800 degrees Fahrenheit, and the temperature needs to rise all the way up to 6,150 degrees Fahrenheit to melt tungsten. Specialized furnaces are needed to…