Bismuth is a white, brittle metal with a slight pink color and is typically recovered as a by-product of lead and copper. It is commonly used as an alloying element for various low melting alloys where it is mixed with other metals such as Lead, Tin, or Cadmium. It is also used as well for a lead substitute in other materials. Our Powder is the finest form that we offer and has become increasingly popular as a substitute for Lead when producing Radiation Shielding Blankets. The powder has a purity of 99%.

Forms:
  • 100 Mesh Powder
Belmont Product Code2003
Nominal Composition:
  • 99% Bi

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